Today
86°
Chance Thunderstorms
42%
Tonight
70°
Chance Thunderstorms
55%
Tomorrow
82°
Thunderstorms
78%
Tomorrow Night
58°
Chance Thunderstorms
29%
Wednesday
75°
Partly Sunny
7%
Wednesday Night
54°
Mostly Clear
2%
Thursday
73°
Partly Sunny
13%
Thursday Night
52°
Mostly Clear
11%
Friday
74°
Mostly Sunny
2%
Friday Night
53°
Mostly Clear
2%
Saturday
76°
Mostly Sunny
3%
Saturday Night
56°
Mostly Clear
4%
3 Day
Extended
Tuesday, July 16th, 2013

Weather heating up

By Shelley Grieshop

Swimmers beat the heat Monday afternoon with lifeguard Nikki Borgerding keeping. . .

It's hot ... get used to it.
High temperatures in the 90s and stifling humidity are predicted through Friday night, making the next four days the hottest yet this summer. The heat index likely will hit the three-digit mark, forecasters said.
"It's going to feel around 100 nearly every day," said Mike Kurz, a meteorologist for the National Weather Service.
The scorching and uncomfortable weather pattern is nothing new for Ohio this time of year.
"Into mid-July and early August is the hottest period for us," Kurz said, adding he's not expecting to break any heat records.
The temperature won't get above 100 most places because of the recent rainfall, he explained.
"We had a lot of precipitation in most places last week," he said. "That lingering moisture in the ground absorbs the heat so we won't get that warm."
Still, as temperatures climb and the high humidity coaxes sweat with minimal exertion, people of all ages need to take precautions, said Anne Larger, community outreach coordinator for Grand Lake Health Systems.
"Dehydration is the biggest problem," she noted.
The elderly, who tend not to drink enough fluids, and youngsters are most at risk, she explained.
"Babies dehydrate quickly," Larger, a registered nurse, added.
Heat exhaustion is evident when someone is sweating heavily, breathing rapidly and has a fast, weak pulse. It can be a precursor to a life-threatening heat stroke when a victim's body temperature rises above 105.1 degrees.
Symptoms of heat-related illnesses can include nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, fever and disorientation. Victims should seek medical attention immediately, Larger advised.
Precautions should be taken during all outdoor activities this week such as construction work and athletic practices. Wear light clothing, drink liquids often and wear sunscreen to prevent sunburn, medical experts say.
The muggy weather pattern is expected to change Friday evening when a cold front approaches from the north bringing lower temperatures and widespread showers and thunderstorms.
"You have a 50 percent chance of storms Friday into Saturday. Whenever you have such hot weather you have to expect the possibility of storms," Kurz said.
Highs and lows through Friday are in the 90s and 70s. Saturday's forecast includes a high of 85 with a 50 percent chance of showers.
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